Glendale Premises Liability Lawyer

Property owners have a legal obligation to ensure the reasonable safety of all permitted visitors to his or her property. This means keeping the property regularly maintained and free from dangerous conditions. An owner who fails to meet this duty may be liable for any accident and injuries that happen on property.

The Glendale premises liability lawyers at Phillips Law Group have decades of experience representing Arizona residents seriously or fatally injured as the result of a property owner’s negligence. We have recovered millions in damages on their behalf, including a $1 million dollar settlement for a client who was paralyzed after suffering a broken neck and collarbone in a premises accident.

Contact us to schedule a free initial consultation. It is completely confidential, and it is an opportunity to learn what your legal options may be. Since we operate on a contingency basis, you will not have any upfront fees if we represent you. We do not get paid unless we recover compensation on your behalf.

Give us a call at 1-800-706-3000 to get started. We are ready to talk to you 24/7.

Do I Have a Case?

Before an experienced lawyer at our firm can help determine whether you may have a case, there are certain elements that must be established to prove negligence in premises liability cases. This includes:

Duty of Care

To establish what is legally known as a duty of care, you must be able to prove that the property owner had a responsibility to properly maintain a safe environment for all visitors. For example, a duty of care may be owed if he or she owned, leased, or otherwise occupied the property at the time of your accident.

Breach of Duty

After establishing that the property owner had a duty of care, you must prove that there was a breach of that duty. The owner knew or should have reasonably known about a potential hazard on his or her property but neglected to take any action to correct the issue. An example of a breach of duty might be if the owner was aware of a damaged sidewalk but did not repair it or warn visitors of the hazard, which ultimately caused someone to be injured.

Link Between Breach and the Injury

You must prove that the breach of duty directly resulted in your injury. This is the most challenging element to establish. Our legal team can conduct a detail investigation and gather eyewitness testimony, along with photographic evidence and medical records to help strengthen your claim for compensation.

Damages Suffered

Finally, you must be able to prove that the breach of duty caused you to suffer damages. This could include medical expenses, lost wages, mental anguish, and pain and suffering.

Proving negligence in a premises liability case can be challenging. This is why it is a good idea to hire a trusted and experienced Glendale premises liability lawyer. We are prepared to guide you throughout the entire legal process, ensuring that your rights and best interests are being protected.

Call 1-800-706-3000 now for our free consultation.

What is My Claim Worth?

It is difficult to quantify your personal injury damages claim before reviewing the specifics of your situation. During a free consultation, our Glendale premises liability attorneys will be able to answer this question in more detail. Several damages typically awarded to premises liability victims include:

  • Lost wages
  • Medical expenses
  • Funeral and burial costs
  • Property damages
  • Loss of earning capacity
  • Physical pain and suffering
  • Damaged reputation or image
  • Mental anguish
  • Emotional trauma
  • Loss of companionship

It is also important to mention that Arizona is a state that follows a comparative negligence statute. In a personal injury claim, this means that if you are found to be partially at fault for the accident, you may still be able to obtain compensation from the liable property owner. However, the damages awarded will be reduced by your percentage of fault.

For example, if you were assigned 10 percent liability for the accident and the total award amount was $100,000, you would be able to receive $90,000. There are many factors that can affect the value of a claim so we recommend reaching out to our firm so that you are not issued more fault than you deserve.   

What is Premises Liability for a Property Owner?

If you are eligible for compensation, it is because the property owner was found to be negligent in his or her duty of care. In more specific context, a property owner in Arizona is considered liable if he or she:

  • Knew about a hazardous condition on his or her property – or the condition existed long enough that he or she should have known about it
  • Maliciously created a condition that directly resulted in the injury or death of the victim
  • Did nothing to warn guests or potential visitors about the known danger

There are reasonable levels of care that a property owner must extend to different types of visitors:

  • Invitee The owner is required to provide notice to any visitor who may be on the property for reasons of business, such as a utility worker or gardener, about any issue that could cause harm.
  • Licensee – Anyone who enters the property as a guest of the owner should be cautioned about any existing dangers that could cause the visitor bodily harm.
  • Child licensee – Any child who is injured on the property as a guest of the owner must be given age-appropriate warnings about any dangerous conditions.
  • Trespasser An uninvited or illegal guest who enters the property without permission of the owner.
  • Child trespasser – Liability for a child trespasser is determined by many elements, including whether or not the property owner was aware – and could have prevented – a child from trespassing on his or her property.

If you have any questions about the claims process or are unsure about the circumstances surrounding your premises liability incident, contact an attorney at Phillips Law Group to review the details of your incident and determine the options that may be available for your specific claim.

Talk to a member of our legal team by calling 1-800-706-3000.

What Causes a Premises Liability Injury?

Premise liability injuries happen because of common maintenance issues that get left undone. There are numerous property hazards that can lead to a serious – or even fatal injury, including:

  • Loose floor boards or ripped carpets
  • Machinery malfunctions
  • Electric shock or burns caused by exposed wiring
  • Broken elevators
  • Wet surface
  • Poor lighting on or around the property
  • Lack of guard rails on stairs
  • Broken swimming pool drains
  • Uneven pavement on the property

Types of Premises Liability Claims We Handle

Any kind of dangerous condition on a residential or commercial property that results in an injury or fatality has the potential to become a premises liability claim. Our experienced Glendale premise liability attorneys have handled numerous premise liability claims over the years, including but not limited to:

  • Slip and fall accidents – This type of accident is quite common and often caused by easily fixed conditions, such as a wet, icy or uneven surface.
  • Construction site injuries Work zones and construction sites are especially dangerous and have many federal and state safety regulations they must meet. If these safety measures are not in place, there may be multiple parties responsible.
  • Negligent security – A property owner may be responsible for providing additional security to protect guests from potential harm. In some areas, knowledge of local criminal activity may require the owner to provide additional security or warnings for any visitors.
  • Swimming pool accidents – Property owners are required to provide reasonable protection against accidental trespassers. This may include putting up fences or other barriers to keep young children from entering a pool unattended and drowning.
  • Dog bites – Property owners in Arizona are held liable if his or her dog attacks another person, regardless of where the attack occurred or whether the owner was negligent.
  • Fires In the event of a fire, residential and business property owners are required to provide appropriate fire safety measures, including fire escapes, fire extinguishers, ladders or alarms.
  • Toxic chemicals Property owners are responsible for protecting the public from any known deadly toxins that may exist on his or her property.

Filing Deadlines for Premises Liability in Arizona

Arizona Revised Statutes (12-542) states that you generally have two years from the date of the accident – or from the date that the injury was first discovered – to file a personal injury claim. This same deadline exists for property damage. In most instances, claims must be filed within two years from the date of the damage. However, as each case is different, you may be required to file before or after this deadline.

Although two years may seem like a long time to file, there is a lot that has to happen to build a strong case. This includes gathering evidence, getting witness statements and conducting a thorough investigation of the incident. Our Glendale personal injury lawyers are tireless when it comes to representing the rights of our injured clients.

Fill out our free online form today to learn whether you may have a claim.

How a Glendale Premises Liability Attorney Can Help

Premises liability cases are often quite complicated. Having an experienced legal team on your side can give you the peace of mind you need, so you can focus on your recovery. At Philips Law Group, we are prepared to review your claim and discuss the legal options available to you during a free consultation.

We have recovered more than $750 million dollars over the past several decades on behalf of our clients. If we present you, we will work hard to make sure that you obtain fair and just compensation. We take cases on a contingency fee basis, which means there are no upfront fees or costs for you to worry about. We do not get paid unless we obtain a recovery for your case.

Our office is conveniently located within three miles from the Maricopa County Courthouse.

Call today at 1-800-706-3000 to see how we may be able to help.

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