Deadly Drug “Krokodil” May Have Entered the U.S.

Posted on behalf of Phillips Law Group on Oct 23, 2013 in Defective Drug

Several reports indicate that the dangerous drug Krokodil may have made its way into the United States from Russia. There are two people in the state of Arizona suspected of using the drug, which is known to rot the skin from the inside.

The team at the Banner Good Samaritan Poison & Drug Information Center in Phoenix have are having trouble confirming the injections were krokodil as the drugs have not yet been tested. They have stated that two other cities in the United States also have unconfirmed cases of krokidil injections.

Krokodil gets its name due to its ability to rot the skin from the inside leaving bone and muscle tissue exposed. The skin will also take a scaly and green appearance, which looks similar to that of a crocodile. This causes most users to dies from loss of skin, infection, and gangrene.

According to the Journal of Addictive Diseases, krokadil was first used in Russia in 2003. It is a homemade drug which combines codeine, lighter fluids, gasoline, paints thinner, alcohol, and other harmful ingredients to give users a feeling similar to heroin.

The drug became popular as other drugs were difficult to smuggle, while its homemade ingredients were not. This caused the drug to spread rapidly throughout Russia, and ultimately make its way into the United States.

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