Understanding Third-Party Workplace Injury Lawsuits

Posted on behalf of Phillips Law Group on Oct 05, 2016 in Workers' Compensation

construction worker clutching neckWhen you get injured at work, you can usually bring a workers’ compensation claim to help pay for medical expenses and lost wages while you recover from your injuries.

However, you might not realize that you may be able to pursue a third-party personal injury claim if your injuries were caused by someone other than your employer.

Third-party injury claims often arise when a third party does maintenance or cleaning at your employer’s premises. For example, if you are the victim of a slip-and-fall accident you may be able to pursue a third-party claim against the cleaning company that did not warn you about the wet floor.

Third-party injury claims are also common at construction sites as they are often maintained by entities other than the employer, especially when the employer is working as a subcontractor on a project. When an entity fails to maintain the premises as it should, and it causes an accident, victims may be able to pursue a third-party claim.

You may also be able to file a third-party claim if you suffered an injury due to the actions of clients or customers.

Can You Sue Your Employer in a Third-Party Claim?

Third-party claims, by nature, involve parties that are not co-workers, supervisors or other representatives of your employer. Usually, employers cannot be sued outside of the workers’ compensation system for work-related injuries.

However, you may be able to pursue a personal injury claim if your employer deliberately harmed you or acted in a way that put you in unreasonable danger, such as failing to follow safety protocols.

An experienced workers’ compensation attorney will be able to explain all of your options after a work injury. The skilled workers' compensation lawyers at Phillips Law Group offer a free, no obligation consultation.

Contact us today by calling or texting 1-800-706-3000 or complete a Free Case Evaluation form.

Back to Top